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Stay healthy during spring break with these travel tips

Posted by Rachael Harter, DO on Mar 17, 2017 9:57:01 AM

What does melting snow, more snow and nonstop basketball signify? Spring is almost here. You’ve made it through another (albeit mild) winter, why not celebrate in a warmer climate? For individuals or families planning to escape the indecisive Minnesota weather with a trip to warmer climates, here are some tips courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Topics: Wellness

50 or older? Schedule your colonoscopy today

Posted by Brian Gootzeit, MD, Gastroenterology, Ridgeview Medical Center on Mar 14, 2017 1:10:59 PM

According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is one of the five most common types of cancer, but thanks in large part to increased awareness about the importance of colonoscopy, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been steadily declining. Typically, colon cancer has no symptoms. Screening is the only way to detect anomalies, including finding and removing polyps before they become cancerous. The purpose of a colonoscopy is to detect early cancers or polyps in the colon (large intestine) and rectum. A polyp is a tiny growth on the inside of the colon. They are usually benign, but sometimes they can become cancerous, which is why adults over age 50 should be tested. It’s a common procedure, yet it seems that everyone wonders what to expect during a colonoscopy.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says up to 60 percent of deaths from colon cancer could be avoided if every 50+ aged individual was screened on a regular basis. If you are in the “average risk” group, you should be tested every 10 years. If you are at higher risk, your doctor may recommend getting your first colonoscopy at an earlier age and/or repeating the exam more often. Higher risk is generally associated with family or personal history with colorectal cancer or chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

Save a life: Learn hands-only CPR

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Mar 7, 2017 12:39:05 PM

Did you know that each year more than 350,000 people in the U.S. suffer from cardiac arrest? Of those, almost 90 percent of them die. CPR, especially if performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival according to the American Heart Association.

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Topics: Wellness

Dr. Laurie Townsend's top three tips for a healthy life

Posted by Laurie Townsend, MD, MBA, Ridgeview Chaska Clinic on Feb 28, 2017 4:20:03 PM

As a primary care provider at Ridgeview Chaska Clinic, the most common concerns I treat in patients are seasonal allergies and hypertension. While there are some ways to reduce and treat seasonal allergies, hypertension can require the most effort on the part of a patient to change their lifestyle.

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Topics: nutrition/diet, Fitness/activity, Wellness

What is Heart Scan Calcium Scoring and how can it help you?

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Feb 21, 2017 1:02:48 PM

In addition to a heart-healthy diet, there are several steps you can take to ensure you're doing everything you can to avoid a cardiac event, such as knowing your risk factors. Unfortunately, many patients who experience a cardiac event never suspected that anything was wrong in the first place.

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Topics: Women's Health

Know the signs of a heart attack: They are different for men and women

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Feb 14, 2017 1:36:07 PM

Heart disease is a top killer of women. It's not just a man's disease. Unfortunately, studies show barely more than half of women recognize that heart disease is their number one killer. One contributing factor is the symptoms of heart attack can be different between the genders and not recognizing the symptoms can lead to greater risk of not surviving a heart attack.

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Topics: Women's Health

Do you know your numbers?

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Feb 7, 2017 1:19:21 PM

You may have heard the phrase "know your numbers" before but what does it really mean to you and your primary care provider? The numbers primary care providers discuss with patients include blood pressure, height and weight, triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose. These numbers, known as biometrics, can provide the information you and your health care provider need to make the right decisions for a healthier life.

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Topics: Women's Health, Wellness

What is palliative care and when should it be considered?

Posted by Jason Kallestad, MD, Medical Director of Palliative Care, Ridgeview Medical Center on Feb 1, 2017 8:01:35 AM

You or someone you love has been diagnosed with a serious illness: cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic lung disease, dementia or stroke. You’ve been told “it can’t be cured but there are treatments that can buy some time.” The disease is causing bothersome or distressing symptoms. You and your family are sad and scared, wondering what to expect as time goes on. You wonder to whom you can turn for support, help managing symptoms, assistance navigating medical decisions. Someone suggested you seek out palliative care but you’ve heard that’s the same as hospice and you’re not ready for that stage. There is always hope. The key is in being thoughtful about what you choose to hope for.

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Topics: Wellness

How do you determine when your child needs to be seen by a specialist?

Posted by Gina Peschel, PA-C, Ridgeview Specialty Clinic-Dermatology on Jan 25, 2017 10:10:43 AM

Sometimes, an illness or condition is beyond the area of expertise of your child's pediatrician and your child will be referred to a specialist. In cases like this, there are several tips you should know that can help you be prepared so your child can receive the best care possible.

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Topics: Primary Care

What is a midwife and how do I choose one?

Posted by Shawn Johnson, CNM, Western OB/GYN, A Division of Ridgeview Clinics on Jan 17, 2017 1:21:30 PM

The word's "Midwife" and midwifery" can both sound a little odd until you know their true meaning. The word midwife dates back to the year 1303 and literally means "with women." Being "with women" is the core of midwifery. Midwives are "with women" throughout their lifetime, from adolescence through menopause, through pregnancy, labor and birth and everything in between.

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Topics: Women's Health

Medical and health information presented here is intended to be general in nature, and should not be viewed as a substitute for professional advice. Please consult with a health care professional for all matters relating to personal medical and health care issues. In case of an emergency, please call 911.