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What is a colonoscopy and when should you have one?

Posted by Sabina Khan, MD, Gastroenterology, Ridgeview Specialty Clinic on Feb 26, 2018 11:10:10 AM

According to the American Cancer Society - colon cancer is one of the five most common types of cancer, but thanks in large part to increased awareness about the importance of colonoscopy - the death rate from colorectal cancer has been steadily declining.

The key is early detection and removal of polyps that could turn into cancer.  In the second article of Ridgeview’s series about colon cancer, we get right to the bottom line: if you’re an adult of a certain age, colon screening could save your life. It’s that simple. When you should have a colonoscopy, and how often, depends on your risk level.

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Topics: Wellness, Colon Cancer

Men's health matters: Schedule your colonoscopy

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Dec 8, 2017 2:01:08 PM

When John Zaske was asked about colonoscopies he was quick to reply with a chuckle, “It’s not something as guys we talk about.”

Born and raised in Arlington, John is the facilities manager at Ridgeview Sibley Medical Center and the Fire Chief of the Arlington Fire Department. He has many friends and family members in town, but doesn’t know whether or not his buddies have had colonoscopies. However, he has and he’s ready to talk about this important cancer screening.

Although John doesn’t have any family history of colon cancer, he suggests, “Not knowing your family history is a reason in itself to get screened.”

Since colonoscopies are currently not a topic of conversation at the fire station, John fully expects to get “razzed” by the guys when they discover that he’s promoting the procedure. “There’s honestly nothing about the screening that’s a big deal—none of it. But cancer IS a big deal. Get screened.”

Colon cancer is one of the five most common types of cancer, but because of increased awareness about the importance of colonoscopy, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been steadily declining, according to the American Cancer Society.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

50 or older? Schedule your colonoscopy today

Posted by Brian Gootzeit, MD, Gastroenterology, Ridgeview Medical Center on Mar 14, 2017 1:10:59 PM

According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is one of the five most common types of cancer, but thanks in large part to increased awareness about the importance of colonoscopy, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been steadily declining. Typically, colon cancer has no symptoms. Screening is the only way to detect anomalies, including finding and removing polyps before they become cancerous. The purpose of a colonoscopy is to detect early cancers or polyps in the colon (large intestine) and rectum. A polyp is a tiny growth on the inside of the colon. They are usually benign, but sometimes they can become cancerous, which is why adults over age 50 should be tested. It’s a common procedure, yet it seems that everyone wonders what to expect during a colonoscopy.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says up to 60 percent of deaths from colon cancer could be avoided if every 50+ aged individual was screened on a regular basis. If you are in the “average risk” group, you should be tested every 10 years. If you are at higher risk, your doctor may recommend getting your first colonoscopy at an earlier age and/or repeating the exam more often. Higher risk is generally associated with family or personal history with colorectal cancer or chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

What you need to know about colon and rectal surgery

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Sep 22, 2015 11:07:00 AM

 

 

Your colon, also known as the large intestine or large bowel, is a muscular tube that connects the small intestine to the rectum. Its job is to absorb water from stool passing through. In the US, colon cancer is the third most common type of cancer and one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Prevention is crucial, but when cancer is detected, colon and rectal surgery is necessary to remove the diseased tissue.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

The three essentials to maintaining a healthy colon

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Aug 18, 2015 11:23:00 AM

If you have had colorectal cancer, maintaining a healthy colon is a priority. Maintaining a healthy colon is important to overall health, and even more important if you've been diagnosed with colorectal cancer. It’s never too late to make better choices about diet and exercise, and the benefits will extend far beyond your intestines. 

Health professionals recommend starting with something that is especially worrisome to you, whether that’s getting your weight under control, quitting smoking or getting more exercise. The reasoning is simple: your biggest concerns often cause you more stress which also impacts your health. Besides, the pride you will feel in making one healthy change will spur you on to make more. 

Focus on these three essentials to maintain a healthy colon:

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Topics: Colon Cancer

The Best Colonoscopy prep checklist

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Aug 13, 2015 10:49:00 AM

 The purpose of a colonoscopy is to enable your doctor or a gastroenterologist to view the inside lining of your colon. Because your colon must be 100 percent devoid of tiny stool particles that can block the view, the best colonscopy prep is a thorough cleanse. Preparing for the procedure isn’t difficult, but it must be done exactly as prescribed.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

What to expect during a colonoscopy

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Aug 11, 2015 1:19:00 PM

 The purpose of a colonoscopy is to detect early cancers or polyps in the colon (large intestine) and rectum. A polyp is a tiny growth on the inside of the colon. They are usually benign, but sometimes they can become cancerous, which is why adults over age 50 should be tested. It’s a common procedure, yet it seems that everyone wonders what to expect during a colonoscopy.

Read More

Topics: Colon Cancer

Understanding Colon Screening

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Apr 21, 2015 11:27:00 AM

What To Expect From A Colonoscopy

If you’re a middle-aged or older adult, we hope you’ve been following Ridgeview’s series about colon cancer, for one very important reason: the American Cancer Society says as many as 60 percent of deaths related to colon cancer could be prevented if everyone age 50 or older had a regular colon screening. In the final article of this series, we’ll explain what to expect from a colonoscopy.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

When should you get a colonoscopy?

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Apr 16, 2015 1:25:00 PM

Guidelines for colon cancer screening

According to the American Cancer Society, colon cancer is one of the five most common types of cancer, but thanks in large part to increased awareness about the importance of colonoscopy, the death rate from colorectal cancer has been steadily declining. The key is early detection and removal of polyps that could turn into cancer.  In the second article of Ridgeview’s series about colon cancer, we get right to the bottom line: if you’re an adult of a certain age, colon screening could save your life. It’s that simple. When you should have a colonoscopy, and how often, depends on your risk level.

Read More

Topics: Wellness, Colon Cancer

Five things you need to know about colon cancer

Posted by Ridgeview Staff on Apr 14, 2015 2:24:00 PM

Understanding colonoscopy and colon cancer

Every adult should be concerned about colon cancer. According to the American Cancer Society it is one of the five most common forms of cancer in the U.S., and of the top causes of cancer deaths. Early detection is crucial, though, so Ridgeview is sharing a three-part series about colon cancer to help you learn more about colonoscopies and other colon cancer screenings that could save your life. In this first article, we’ll detail five key facts you need to know about colon cancer.

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Topics: Colon Cancer

Medical and health information presented here is intended to be general in nature, and should not be viewed as a substitute for professional advice. Please consult with a health care professional for all matters relating to personal medical and health care issues. In case of an emergency, please call 911. 

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